Selected Works

Henry Pickford
By
Rüdiger Dannemann, Henry Pickford & Hans-Ernst Schiller Hrsg

This volume collects essays largely from the conference "Der aufrechte Gang im windschiefen Kapitalismus“, hosted in 2016 by the Nietzsche Kolleg in Weimar. The goal of the conference was to bring together diverse traditions, to analyze and actualize models of critical thought and to open new perspectives for social theory.

The contributions aim to ascertain and clarify the standpoint of critical theories, reflecting on their origins, exploring their diagnostic potential today and documenting their interdisciplinary character. The “upright gait” (Ernst Bloch) in thinking means not to be constrained by the preponderance of the existing order, to resist conformist acceptance as well as irrational accounts, and to maintain the possibility of the new, utopia.

"Sibling Action: The Genealogical Structure of Modernity"
By
Stefani Engelstein

This provocative book argues that the pervasive relational paradigm of the sibling shaped the modern subject, life sciences, human sciences, and collective identities such as race, religion, and gender. Integrating close readings of literature and other disciplines with panoramic intellectual history, Sibling Action presents a compelling new understanding of systems of knowledge.

Henry Pickford
By
Henry W. Pickford

In this highly original interdisciplinary study incorporating close readings of literary texts and philosophical argumentation, Henry W. Pickford develops a theory of meaning and expression in art intended to counter the meaning skepticism most commonly associated with the theories of Jacques Derrida. Pickford arrives at his theory by drawing on the writings of Wittgenstein to develop and modify the insights of Tolstoy’s philosophy of art. Pickford shows how Tolstoy’s encounter with Schopenhauer’s thought on the one hand provided support for his ethical views but on the other hand presented a problem, exemplified in the case of music, for his aesthetic theory, a problem that Tolstoy did not successfully resolve. Wittgenstein’s critical appreciation of Tolstoy’s thinking, however, not only recovers its viability but also constructs a formidable position within contemporary debates concerning theories of emotion, ethics, and aesthetic expression.

The Vocabulary of Desire: The Song of Songs in the Early Synagogue
By
Laura S. Lieber

The book examines piyyutim (liturgical poems) and explains certain concepts concerning the structure and the religious messages of the piyyut and the culture that produced it.

Sociability and Its Enemies: German Political Theory After 1945
By
Jakob Norberg

The book sheds light on previously neglected historical and conceptual connections among political theorists, and it enriches established narratives of postwar intellectual history.

Rounding Wagner’s Mountain: Richard Strauss and Modern German Opera
By
Bryan Gilliam

Though this study addresses relevant musical issues, it explores the historical, aesthetic, philosophical, and literary issues surrounding the operatic works of Strauss.

Minding the Modern
By
Thomas Pfau

Pfau argues in this study, that the loss of foundational concepts in classical and medieval Aristotelian philosophy caused a fateful separation between reason and will in European thought.

The Sense of Semblance: Philosophical Analyses of Holocaust Art
By
Henry W. Pickford

This is the first book to incorporate contemporary analytic philosophy in interpretations of art and architecture, literature, and film about the Holocaust.

In Defense of Intuitions: A New Rationalist Manifesto
By
Andrew Chapman, Addison Ellis, Robert Hanna, Tyler Hildebrand, and Henry W. Pickford

This book is an attempt to respond critically, directly, and decisively to the most important contemporary skeptical anti-rationalist attacks on intuitions and a priori knowledge in philosophy, and to defend neo-rationalism from a contemporary Kantian standpoint.

Militarism in a Global Age: Naval Ambitions in Germany and the United States Before World War I
By
Dirk Bönker

The book explores the far-reaching ambitions of naval officers before World War I as they advanced navalism, a particular brand of modern militarism that stressed the paramount importance of sea power as a historical determinant.

Romanticism and Modernity
By
Thomas Pfau and Robert Mitchell (editors)

This collection collectively emphasizes the importance of understanding modernity through the lens of Romanticism, rather than simply understanding Romanticism as part of modernity.

Contemplating Violence: Critical Studies in Modern German Culture
By
Stefani Englestein and Carl Niekerk (editors)

This volume illuminates the vexed treatment of violence in the German cultural tradition between two crucial, and radically different, violent outbreaks: the French Revolution, and the Holocaust and Second World War.

Yannai on Genesis: An Invitation to Piyyut
By
Laura Lieber

Piyyut is the art of Hebrew or Aramaic poetry composed either in place of or as adornments to Jewish statutory prayers. Lieber uses the piyyutim of a single poet, Yannai (ca. sixth century C.E.), to introduce readers to this important but largely unfamiliar body of writings.

The Last Witch of Langenburg: Murder in a German Village
By
Thomas Robisheaux

On the night of the festive holiday of Shrove Tuesday in 1672 Anna Fessler died after eating one of her neighbor's buttery cakes. Could it have been poisoned? Drawing on vivid court documents, eyewitness accounts, and an early autopsy report, Robisheaux brings the story to life.

Anxious Anatomy: The Conception of the Human Form in Literary and Naturalist Discourse
By
Stefani Engelstein

Engelstein reconstructs the late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century human body to offer startling new readings of major works by Goethe, Blake, Heinrich von Kleist, E.T.A. Hoffmann, Mary Shelley, and Jane Austen.

Critical Models: Interventions and Catchwords, by Theodor W. Adorno
By
Henry W. Pickford (translator)

The book combines into a single volume two of Adorno's most important postwar works written after his return to Germany in 1949. The articles, essays, and radio talks included in this volume speak to the pressing political, cultural, and philosophical concerns of the postwar era.

Romantic Moods: Paranoia, Trauma, and Melancholy, 1790-1840
By
Thomas Pfau

Pfau reinterprets the evolution of British and German Romanticism as a progress through three successive dominant moods, each manifested in the "voice" of an historical moment.