Courses Abroad

Fall Semester Courses

GERMAN 111A: Introduction to the German Language
Students will be exposed to the fields of reading, writing, listening and speaking and will be trained so that they can take full advantage of being in the target country. After a short period, students will be able to communicate with native German speakers on a basic level. (Two course credits)

GERMAN 212A: Intensive Intermediate German
Intensive grammar review and practice of spoken and written German. The course covers the work of second-year college German. Taught by the resident director and program faculty. (Two course credits)

GERMAN 312A: Advanced German Language and Culture
Development of advanced proficiency with particular emphasis on speaking and writing. Analysis of literary and non-literary texts, excursions, museums, films, theater performances. Advanced grammar review, vocabulary building, oral presentation, written assignments. The course covers the work of third and/or fourth year college German. Taught by the resident director. (Two course credits)

ARTHIST 296A: Berlin: Architecture and the City, 1871 to the Present
Development of urban Berlin, from the Gründerzeit (the Boom Years) of the 1870s to the present: Architecture of Imperial Berlin, the Weimar and Nazi periods, post-World War II and the reconstruction as a unified city, from late Historicism to Postmodernism. Taught by German faculty. (One course credit)

ECON 260: Economics of a United Europe
Implications of a common monetary policy, common welfare standards, unemployment, and migration in the European Union. Taught by a leading German expert. (One course credit)

POLSCI 201: Environmental Policy in Europe
Economic concepts and environmental policies with their application to selected environmental issues in Western and Eastern Europe, transboundary pollution problems, and the role of the European Community. Taught by a leading German expert. (One course credit)

Spring Semester Courses 

GERMAN 111A: Introduction to the German Language
Students will be exposed to the fields of reading, writing, listening and speaking and will be trained so that they can take full advantage of being in the target country. After a short period, students will be able to communicate with native German speakers on a basic level. (One course credit)

GERMAN 319AS: Advanced Intensive German
Advanced language work in comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Includes discussion of current events from various media. Prepares students for the German language exam required of all foreign students enrolling in German universities. Taught by program faculty from February until March or early April when the university administers the language exam. (One course credit)

GERMAN 352AS: Berlin in Literature and Culture
Looks at the works of modern German writers with special focus on Berlin and the political-cultural heritage of its divided years. Emphasis on the art and architecture of the city. Part 1 prepares participants for the excursion to classical Weimar and environs by reading relevant texts. Part II has a strong emphasis on theater productions in Berlin, corresponding literature and its “Zeitgeist”. Taught by the resident director, from February to mid-July. (One course credit)

POLSCI 202A / History 266A : Germany of Today: A European Superpower?
The political, military, and economic role of the reunified Germany within the European Union. An analysis of the political system of the Federal Republic of Germany and of the structure of the European Union. Taught by German faculty during the regular Berlin summer semester, from mid-April to late July (One course credit)

Special Winter Course

Mid October - Mid February
Students who have completed two years of college-level German and plan to attend the full academic year, may enroll in a fifth course at Humboldt Universität or at the Technische Universität from mid October to mid February with a short Christmas break. They will earn transfer credit for this course and pay an additional fee for accommodations. For Humboldt courses, check www.hu-berlin.de. For T.U.B. courses check www.tu-berlin.de.

Engineering Track

GERMAN 213A: Intensive Intermediate German for Engineers and others
A 4-week language course in January taught in Berlin by faculty at the Technische Universität. (One course credit)

GERMAN 319AS: Advanced Intensive German
Advanced language work in comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Includes discussion of current events from various media. Prepares students for the German language exam required of all foreign students enrolling in German universities. Taught by program faculty from February until March or early April when the university administers the language exam. (One course credit)

GERMAN 352AS: Berlin in Literature and Culture
Looks at the works of modern German writers with special focus on Berlin and the political-cultural heritage of its divided years. Emphasis on the art and architecture of the city. Part 1 prepares participants for the excursion to classical Weimar and environs by reading relevant texts. Part II has a strong emphasis on theater productions in Berlin, corresponding literature and its “Zeitgeist”. Taught by the resident director, from February to mid-July. (One course credit)

Students will also take two direct enrollment engineering courses in their major at the Technische Universität in Berlin from April through July.

Summer Courses Taught in German*

GERMAN 101 and 102: First Year German I and II  (FL)
Introduction to German language and culture. Four-skills (understanding, speaking, reading, writing)and communicative approach to the language of everyday life in German-speaking countries, the language of their histories and societies, their arts and letters.

GERMAN 203 and 204: Intermediate German I and II (CZ, FL)
Each of these courses builds language proficiency through a topic-oriented syllabus focusing on contemporary German-speaking cultures and societies (family, leisure, work, education, environment, current events). Provides a thorough review of German grammar. Authentic texts from a variety of media will provide the basis for discussion and cultural awareness.

GERMAN 303AS: Advanced German in Berlin (ALP, CCI, CZ, FL)
Reading and discussion of advanced material centered largely on contemporary Berlin. Development of written and oral proficiency in German, as well as insight into the cultural and historical aspects of the capital. Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent. May substitute for 305S or 306S to fulfill German major requirement.

Summer Courses Taught in English*

GERMAN 365A / ARTHIST 297A: Art & Architecture of Berlin: Fifteenth to the Twentieth Century (ALP, CCI, CZ)
The main goal of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the visual arts of Germany from the 15th to the 20th century through lectures conducted in Berlin’s museums and cultural institution. Classroom lectures will be kept to a minimum so that students may encounter actual works of art in the city’s magnificent collections. Some lectures will be conducted by guest speakers, such as curators from the Bauhaus Archiv or the Neue Nationalgalerie. Students will learn about the German Old Masters, such as Albrecht Dürer and Lucas Cranach, as well German Romantic and Realist artists, including Caspar David Friedrich and Adolf Menzel. Germany’s powerful modernist art movements, such as Expressionism and New Objectivity, will be considered in relation to the many upheavals in modern German history. By the end of the course, students will not only have a broad understanding of the development of the visual arts in Germany but also of how art has served in the elusive search and articulation of German cultural identity.  Includes architectural bus & walking tours, as well as an excursion to the castles of Potsdam. Cross-listed: ARTHIST 190B  Art & Architecture of Berlin: Fifteenth to the Twentieth Century.

GERMAN 362SA /Economics of Green Germany (SS,STS, EI)
Comprehensive overview of the Energiewende - Germany's effort to reshape its energy system, the industry, and building sectors into a nuclear-free, low-carbon economy. Application of a range of analytical methods - including economic assessment tools, legal analyses and political science - to shed light on different facets of the Energiewende, and to help understand the public and academic debates around it. The course thus offers different angles - looking at the economics of the Energiewende, as well as the technological, social, ethical, legal and political implications.  Cross-listed as ENVIRON 367SA and ECON 331SA.

GERMAN 366A / HISTORY 334DA: Berlin Since the War  (CCI, CZ)
This course seeks to understand how Berlin remembers its famous and infamous past since the Second World War—and in some cases reaching back even further. In order to assess the efficacy of public memorials, monuments, museums and manifestos, students are first given a survey of the history of Cold War and post-Wall Berlin. The real work of the course commences as students then set out to explore—with the instructor—how “official” history is constructed, celebrated, contested, re-written—and not infrequently, simply ignored. In addition to seminar discussion, this course consists of numerous excursions to historical sites. The final project requires participants to evaluate the significance of a public memorial (or museum exhibition) based on criteria that are worked out during the course. Cross-listed: HISTORY 100L - 01  Duke in Berlin Topics. 

GERMAN 368 / Jewish Studies 368 (CCI, EI): Jewish Berlin: German-Jewish Culture from the Enlightenment to the Present
Germany is the home of the Jewish Reform Movement, and Berlin in particular is the location of numerous important Jewish sites of interest: the world famous “Jewish Museum” (Jüdisches Museum), the Centrum Judaicum (built on the site of Berlin’s once lavishly outfitted “Neue Synagoge” – or New Synagogue), and the controversial “Monument to the Destruction of the European Jews.” Indeed, it is also home to numerous stunning memorials to the Holocaust—including the concentration camp Sachsenhausen, just north of the city. It was in Berlin that the “Women of the Rosenstrasse” protested the incarceration of their Jewish husbands—and actually got them released (the only time German civilians undertook such a protest effort). In this course, we will visit this aesthetically innovative and historically rich monument, as well as many others, including the so-called “Mirror Wall” of Steglitz, and the understated Memorial to Deportation in Grunewald. But we will also survey the astounding story of Jewish life and acculturation to German culture, beginning with Moses Mendelsohn (whose grave we will visit, along with the poignant Weissensee cemetery). In addition we’ll have the opportunity to attend services at the Pestalozistrasse Synagogue (open to Jews and non-Jews alike).

GERMAN 222SA (ALP, CCI). Capturing the City: Documentary Photography in Berlin.
Through excursions to museums, art galleries, and studio visits with photographers and documentarians in Berlin, students will learn and practice the analysis and interpretation of still photography. Students will conduct documentary photography fieldwork projects focused on interpreting cultural life, public spaces, landscapes, and people in Berlin, and will mount an exhibition of their work. Students will learn the techniques and practice of color photography—composition, lighting, color correction, editing, and sequencing—alongside studying the history and development of documentary photography in Germany. Project fieldwork sites may include Tempelhof airfield (a Nazi-era airport made famous during the 1948–1949 Berlin Airlift and now used as a public park as well as reception center for refugees), flea markets, and the Berlin U-Bahn.

Cross-Listed: DOCST 171SA, ARTVIS 17SA, VMS 171SA

* Please note that these offerings are subject to change. Please contact the Directors of the Duke in Berlin program, Susanne Freytag (susanne.freytag@duke.edu) or Professor Jakob Norberg (jn43@duke.edu) for the most current course listings.